1). Break learning down into bite-sized, impactful chunks

So, who are Gen Z? – Generation Z are those born from 1996 to 2012 – and soon to become a prominent part of the workforce, bringing with them fresh ideas and new ways of working.

There will be two things to consider when looking to hiring Generation Z employees – their desire to receive information instantly and their wavering attention spans.

Both of these factors should inspire you to introduce a ‘microlearning’ framework.

If you’ve downloaded a language app like Duolingo lately, you will know what microlearning is – punchy, bite-sized learning and development frameworks delivered at a time and place that suits your busy schedule.

Microlearning breaks information down into short bursts, using concise paragraphs, illustrations, audio snippets and interactive games/quizzes.

This new way of learning meets the needs of the modern workforce and has proven to be more engaging, efficient and cost-effective than other methods.

By creating bite-sized learning courses, you remove the need to pay for an instructor, utilities, classroom equipment and reprinting training manuals when updates are made. According to academic Ray Jimenez’s book 3-minute eLearning, learning developers can reduce development costs by 50 percent.

Introducing microlearning also helps companies increase retention and productivity. According to a recent survey, microlearning improves focus and supports long-term retention by up to 80 percent.

There are a number of free and very affordable microlearning apps that you could use to create new staff training programmes. Further examples can also be found here.

If you want to access support from experts, our Higher Level Skills Match (HLSM) project can introduce you to BCU academics and students who can help you build a basic training management system.

2). Human touch is important

It’s well established that your future workforce know technology like the back of their hand. However, they’re not robots always glued to their phones.

Surveys show that 72 percent of Generation Z employees prefer face-to-face communication at work.

This doesn’t necessarily have to be in person – Generation Z often use FaceTime, Zoom or Skype as methods of face-to-face communication. These virtual environments are a natural way for your future employees to build their relationships with their peers.

Therefore, utilising virtual or real-life face-to-face learning and development frameworks can help you recruit and retain fresh talent, and can also establish a symbiotic relationship with your staff – your new recruits can be mentored by more experienced staff, while the latter can learn new techniques and methods from the former.

Consider hackathons, role-playing activities, design challenges, mentorship programmes and live discussion groups as new methods of learning.

3). Create your learning with smartphones in mind

Bring your training to where Generation Z lives – on their smartphones. It may sound like a generalisation, but it is an accurate one, with 55 percent of them using their smartphones for more than five hours a day.

Therefore, it is imperative that you build frameworks with a mobile-first design that is succinct, simple and interactive.

You will not retain interest if this mobile technology is too complicated or slow, however. Ensure your information is relevant, has a clear design and simple navigation.

As mentioned earlier, incorporating interaction between colleagues and microlearning strategies will further bolster its appeal.

If you are looking for cheap, effective and easy-to-use mobile training content, eLearning Centre has created a list of some of the UK’s best providers.

4). Immersive, personalised learning

Your future workforce is adept at immersive learning, in which training is brought to life in a way that is interactive and engaging.

Immersive training uses technologies such as augmented and virtual reality (AR and VR), respectively, to create engaging learning in a controlled environment.

AR and VR can offer an introduction to new systems, minimises risks and facilitate accelerated training. Immersive learning environments can generate as much as 40 percent in training time and cost savings.

Furthermore, artificial intelligence (AI) is a key trend that has been used to support human workers, becoming one of the most relevant tools in the talent management industry.

54 percent of executives state that implementing AI is increasing productivity.

Using AI software can help you increase the level of difficulty when a learner is doing well or reducing it when they need further support.

Utilising this software can also help you identify areas for improvement on an individual or team level, enabling you to deliver additional material that covers specific skills gaps.

Interested in implementing some of these technologies into your business? HLSM can help you make vital connections to make it happen.

5). Cross-training ticks the boxes

The changing workforce of today wants to know everything – and that can be advantageous to your business.

Offer training that extends an employee’s capabilities. Offer sales training to a marketing officer or vice versa.

When it comes to enticing Generation Z employees to your business, agility is paramount.

This will enable employees to perform quick pivots, making your workplace more flexible and better positioned to deal with changing circumstances. It will help you close those skills gaps and place you ahead of the curve when it comes to recruitment.

Tailored, hands-on support to solve your business challenges

Our award-winning HLSM project understands the needs of modern businesses by working closely with them to identify their requirements, fill skills gaps and recruit a talented student/graduate that can meet the business’ needs.

HLSM, which is part-funded by the European Social Fund, is a unique partnership between BCU, Aston University, Newman University and local councils to introduce better business growth for SMEs in the Greater Birmingham and Solihull Local Enterprise Partnership area. 

HLSM’s account manager provides one-to-one support, as well as a business skills needs assessment, which provides comprehensive evidence of what challenges the business is facing and how we can support.

The project ensures it matches the right student and graduate talent to the business, offering mutual benefits – our students and graduates build their real-world experience and get to apply their knowledge, while local businesses can address and solve challenges they are facing.

“HLSM looks to meet the needs of the changing workforce by offering tailored, focused support, as well as providing a talented student or graduate, adept at skills in current ways of working,” explains Nicole Riley, Graduate Talent Consultant.

“If you are looking to develop new ways of working – whether it be to recruit new talent, fill skills gaps or stay ahead of the competition – we have the talent, knowledge, resources and commitment to help make it happen.”

Looking for further guidance on building new learning and development frameworks? Get in touch and find out how HLSM can support your business.

Click here to enquire about Higher Level Skills Match

Why is hiring young talent so important?

After a Covid-induced slump, UK hiring is on the up – hitting its fastest rates in 23 years. Combine this with the acceleration of baby boomers retiring and it gives your business a prime opportunity to bring in employees with fresh energy and a new set of skills.

It could solve a challenge that businesses across multiple sectors are facing – currently, more than 70 percent of large firms and nearly 50 percent of smaller companies are suffering from skills shortages.

Bringing in enthusiastic young talent could revolutionise your entire business both in the short and long term.

For example, new recruits will bring with them desirable skills in modern technology usage and could help to embed emerging technologies into your business.

Adopting augmented reality, AI and the Internet of Things could all become achievable outcomes.

This will continue to aid and benefit your business for years to come. By adopting new technologies, you create an environment that is attractive to future employees, who will then – in turn – provide new ideas of their own.

It’s a cycle that could yield improved results, exciting new developments and an energetic, positive work environment.

So, if hiring young talent can make such a big difference, how does your business attract them?

Prioritise your employees’ health

The mental and physical wellbeing of your employees should be a cornerstone of your talent management. It is often a deciding factor in whether an employee stays or goes.

Recent studies have shown that three in ten UK workers consider quitting their job because of poor mental health.

Meanwhile, 2021 saw “the great resignation”, in which four million people quit their jobs to seek better working conditions.

Even if you do not lose your employees altogether, you could still face losing them temporarily – stress and anxiety were the majority factors in work days lost in 2019/20.

It is important to survey your current employees and get a feel for their priorities. Ensure that they are not overworked and that they have a good work/life balance.

This is especially true if you have employees working remotely, whether it be full-time or in a hybrid working capacity. While many felt liberated working from home, 29 percent admit that they struggle to switch off from their work.

It is also vital to make sure that your employees feel valued by offering supportive opportunities such as reward programmes, new courses, safe spaces for communication on mental health and more.

80 percent of business leaders report that wellbeing is important to their organisation’s success – if you have not done so already, it is time to make employee health a priority.

Embrace new technology and ways of working

The Covid-19 pandemic has caused dramatic, long-term shifts in the way that people work. It is no surprise, then, that traditional methods of talent management are falling out of favour.  

According to a recent HR systems survey, 28 percent of organisations plan on increasing their non-traditional HR spending – with the figure set to grow with each passing month.

Furthermore, over 30 percent of companies are rethinking learning, time and recruiting tools. The latter is especially important – 54 percent of Gen Z’ers won’t even complete an application form if it uses outdated recruiting methods.

To be competitive, your methods need to reflect the needs and beliefs of the young talent you aim to recruit.

As previously mentioned, AI is a key HR trend, with 54 percent of executives stating that implementing AI has increased productivity.

AI has been used to support human workers, becoming one of the most relevant tools in the talent management industry.

Young talent also thrives on receiving feedback, so look to install systems that allow regular performance mechanisms, surveys, progress reports and more.

Alongside technology, it is also time to embrace new methods of working. One example is the gig economy, people working in part-time or temporary positions or as independent contractors.

The number of adults in the UK working for gig economies – such as Uber and Deliveroo – has now reached 4.4 million, two-and-a-half times bigger than 2016.

With so many workers now favouring this method, this could be a line of work that you look to tap into, depending on what projects or tasks your business is focusing on.

Award-winning talent management support

If you are looking to gain new skills, knowledge and hire young talent, our Higher Level Skills Match (HLSM) account managed recruitment and upskilling service can help your team expand.

HLSM, which is part-funded by the European Social Fund, is an award-winning collaboration between BCU, Aston University, Newman University, and local councils Tamworth Borough Council and Lichfield District Council.

The service works in partnerships with small and medium-sized businesses to identify their skills gaps and help source new recruits and support in talent management.  

HLSM has engaged with over 801 students and graduates on numerous initiatives, placing 50 of them into placements or graduate-level roles.

When joining HLSM, you are matched with a dedicated account manager who will identify and match the talent requirements of your business to the training opportunities and highly skilled graduates of BCU and partner universities.

HLSM has been championed for its support for young talent and businesses, winning the AGCAS Building Effective Partnerships Award in 2020.

This year, it has been shortlisted for accolades at the National Undergraduate Employability Awards and the Greater Birmingham Chamber of Commerce Awards, respectively.

It has also been well received by clients, with 95 percent of businesses signed off from the project reporting the project has had a positive impact.

Click here to learn more about Higher Level Skills Match

1). Break learning down into bite-sized, impactful chunks

So, who are Gen Z? – Generation Z are those born from 1996 to 2012 – and soon to become a prominent part of the workforce, bringing with them fresh ideas and new ways of working.

There will be two things to consider when looking to hiring Generation Z employees – their desire to receive information instantly and their wavering attention spans.

Both of these factors should inspire you to introduce a ‘microlearning’ framework.

If you’ve downloaded a language app like Duolingo lately, you will know what microlearning is – punchy, bite-sized learning and development frameworks delivered at a time and place that suits your busy schedule.

Microlearning breaks information down into short bursts, using concise paragraphs, illustrations, audio snippets and interactive games/quizzes.

This new way of learning meets the needs of the modern workforce and has proven to be more engaging, efficient and cost-effective than other methods.

By creating bite-sized learning courses, you remove the need to pay for an instructor, utilities, classroom equipment and reprinting training manuals when updates are made. According to academic Ray Jimenez’s book 3-minute eLearning, learning developers can reduce development costs by 50 percent.

Introducing microlearning also helps companies increase retention and productivity. According to a recent survey, microlearning improves focus and supports long-term retention by up to 80 percent.

There are a number of free and very affordable microlearning apps that you could use to create new staff training programmes. Further examples can also be found here.

If you want to access support from experts, our Higher Level Skills Match (HLSM) project can introduce you to BCU academics and students who can help you build a basic training management system.

2). Human touch is important

It’s well established that your future workforce know technology like the back of their hand. However, they’re not robots always glued to their phones.

Surveys show that 72 percent of Generation Z employees prefer face-to-face communication at work.

This doesn’t necessarily have to be in person – Generation Z often use FaceTime, Zoom or Skype as methods of face-to-face communication. These virtual environments are a natural way for your future employees to build their relationships with their peers.

Therefore, utilising virtual or real-life face-to-face learning and development frameworks can help you recruit and retain fresh talent, and can also establish a symbiotic relationship with your staff – your new recruits can be mentored by more experienced staff, while the latter can learn new techniques and methods from the former.

Consider hackathons, role-playing activities, design challenges, mentorship programmes and live discussion groups as new methods of learning.

3). Create your learning with smartphones in mind

Bring your training to where Generation Z lives – on their smartphones. It may sound like a generalisation, but it is an accurate one, with 55 percent of them using their smartphones for more than five hours a day.

Therefore, it is imperative that you build frameworks with a mobile-first design that is succinct, simple and interactive.

You will not retain interest if this mobile technology is too complicated or slow, however. Ensure your information is relevant, has a clear design and simple navigation.

As mentioned earlier, incorporating interaction between colleagues and microlearning strategies will further bolster its appeal.

If you are looking for cheap, effective and easy-to-use mobile training content, eLearning Centre has created a list of some of the UK’s best providers.

4). Immersive, personalised learning

Your future workforce is adept at immersive learning, in which training is brought to life in a way that is interactive and engaging.

Immersive training uses technologies such as augmented and virtual reality (AR and VR), respectively, to create engaging learning in a controlled environment.

AR and VR can offer an introduction to new systems, minimises risks and facilitate accelerated training. Immersive learning environments can generate as much as 40 percent in training time and cost savings.

Furthermore, artificial intelligence (AI) is a key trend that has been used to support human workers, becoming one of the most relevant tools in the talent management industry.

54 percent of executives state that implementing AI is increasing productivity.

Using AI software can help you increase the level of difficulty when a learner is doing well or reducing it when they need further support.

Utilising this software can also help you identify areas for improvement on an individual or team level, enabling you to deliver additional material that covers specific skills gaps.

Interested in implementing some of these technologies into your business? HLSM can help you make vital connections to make it happen.

5). Cross-training ticks the boxes

The changing workforce of today wants to know everything – and that can be advantageous to your business.

Offer training that extends an employee’s capabilities. Offer sales training to a marketing officer or vice versa.

When it comes to enticing Generation Z employees to your business, agility is paramount.

This will enable employees to perform quick pivots, making your workplace more flexible and better positioned to deal with changing circumstances. It will help you close those skills gaps and place you ahead of the curve when it comes to recruitment.

Tailored, hands-on support to solve your business challenges

Our award-winning HLSM project understands the needs of modern businesses by working closely with them to identify their requirements, fill skills gaps and recruit a talented student/graduate that can meet the business’ needs.

HLSM, which is part-funded by the European Social Fund, is a unique partnership between BCU, Aston University, Newman University and local councils to introduce better business growth for SMEs in the Greater Birmingham and Solihull Local Enterprise Partnership area. 

HLSM’s account manager provides one-to-one support, as well as a business skills needs assessment, which provides comprehensive evidence of what challenges the business is facing and how we can support.

The project ensures it matches the right student and graduate talent to the business, offering mutual benefits – our students and graduates build their real-world experience and get to apply their knowledge, while local businesses can address and solve challenges they are facing.

“HLSM looks to meet the needs of the changing workforce by offering tailored, focused support, as well as providing a talented student or graduate, adept at skills in current ways of working,” explains Nicole Riley, Graduate Talent Consultant.

“If you are looking to develop new ways of working – whether it be to recruit new talent, fill skills gaps or stay ahead of the competition – we have the talent, knowledge, resources and commitment to help make it happen.”

Looking for further guidance on building new learning and development frameworks? Get in touch and find out how HLSM can support your business.

Click here to enquire about Higher Level Skills Match

Understanding what startup business tools are available

You’ve created an amazing business idea. You’re passionate about the project and feel this could be a viable business. The only trouble is you’re not quite sure of what business support is out there.

The pandemic has been the catalyst for new businesses, with a new record of 772,000 businesses forming in 2020.

Birmingham has spent many years as the UK’s regional startup capital, but the truth is not enough startups succeed – according to Embroker, 90 percent of startups fail.

This is because not enough new businesses seek the right support. This may be because it’s too expensive, that they’re unsure of which path to take or whether it doesn’t work for them logistically.

It’s important to become familiar with the startup business process and plan effectively.

One of the most important things you should consider is whether there is demand for your idea. You may already be thinking about this but are unsure how to actually prove that people want it.

One idea could be to conduct some surveys. SurveyMonkey is a great online tool that could help you gauge some interest and ask some specific questions.

Furthermore, HubSpot’s customer persona creator can help you build a profile of your potential client.

It’s also important to choose your business name carefully. Ensure it is not too restrictive and appeals to a broad range of people.

Business incubation support

A business incubator should be one of the first ports of call in the startup business process.

They are designed to support startups during those early, fragile stages of growth, providing access to funding, excellent facilities and expert advice.

According to research by the National Business Incubation Association, companies nurtured in a business incubator have a survival rate of 87 percent, compared with just 44 percent for those who don’t.

In a recent report from the UK Government, it revealed that “most startups consider the contribution of the incubator to have been significant or even vital to their success.”

Hence, a business incubation service is one of the most invaluable startup business tools available. So why don’t more budding businesspeople use them?

Sometimes, it can be the location of the incubator in relation to the business. Incubation programmes can also be expensive, requiring entrepreneurs to give up valuable equity.

Furthermore, many incubators have a low acceptance rate, only selecting the most promising startup ideas.

However, things are much different at STEAMhouse Incubator. Ideally located in Birmingham City Centre, it provides free support for entrepreneurs from a range of backgrounds, with a range of ideas.

Not only that, but each startup is given a specific set of milestones to reach, tailored to suit the scale, ambition and growth of their company.

This bespoke support and guidance ensures startups feel valued and appreciated, while the Incubator’s amazing facilities – including dedicated workstations, workshop areas and collaborative workspaces – enable a startup to thrive.

“When I was first given a tour of the Incubator, I was blown away,” says Simon Caulton, the owner of a budding trainer business and the first client of STEAMhouse Incubator.

“The Incubator have been an amazing source of information and advice. Because of the Incubator, I gained the information and tools needed to make more confident business decisions.”

Student or graduate startup support

According to recent research from Santander UK, over a quarter of university students currently run or plan to run a business while at university.

Almost one in ten entrepreneurs are already running a business alongside their studies, a number that continues to grow with each passing year.

Furthermore, 48 percent of students said they plan to continue their business as a second job once they have graduated.

It is no surprise that there is an increased desire among students and graduates to start their own businesses.

In recent times, there have been globally successful examples, most notably Gymshark and Lounge Underwear, who have built a long-lasting partnership with Birmingham City University.

However, there are a number of common pitfalls that student startups can fall foul to, including:

If you have graduated within the last five years or are currently a BCU student, our BSEEN business startup service can help overcome these hurdles.

Armed with a variety of business planning techniques, BSEEN is a twelve-month, free service that provides one-to-one mentoring, access to grant and funding opportunities, as well as access to business facilities across the BCU campus.


Looking for startup business tools that could help build your business?

Click here to enquire about STEAMhouse Incubator

1). Think carefully about your business plan

There are three reasons for writing a business plan:

  1. Direction of travel (where you want your business to go) and to potentially raise investment.
  2. Executive summary – This is the most important part as it’ll provide a succinct description of what your business does.
  3. A reminder of why you started your business in the first place.

The executive summary, in particular, is a vital part of your business planning process. You won’t appeal to investors if your business plan doesn’t say what problems you are going to solve.

It’s not enough to say “I’m going to sell you dolls”, for example. You need to say “I’m going to sell dolls because I’ll be targeting a specific demographic that has never been reached before.”

2). The days of big business plans are over

In the old days of launching a startup, you’d be writing a lengthy, technical document. Not anymore.

It now needs to be informal and less detailed. People need to pivot and change quickly – just look at Covid-19. If you’ve got a 50-page plan, you’re never going to be able to change.

At STEAMhouse Incubator, we do a small, 10-page business plan, allowing room to pivot.

3). Don’t forget your sales forecast

One of the things that people forget is their sales forecast. It’s an essential part of the startup business cycle and should not be treated lightly.

People don’t understand the forecasting and that’s what investors look at. If you’re investing in someone and they don’t know when they’re going to break even or when they’re going to make a point, you’re not going to invest.

90 percent of businesses fall down when it comes to this. STEAMhouse Incubator makes this a priority.

4). Get networking

An essential part of your business planning process is the elevator pitch. For those that don’t know, the elevator pitch is a brief, persuasive speech that arouses interest in your business.

You need to have full confidence in your product, of course, and us here at the Incubator will develop milestones to help you build your confidence.

5). Be aware of the competition

Competitor analysis is a core part of the startup business cycle. You’ve got to be aware of your competitors, but not so much that it dictates the strategy of your business. Do not plan your business around your competition.

The big thing has to be that you have a product that represents good value for money. You need to understand your customers’ value and you need to know your customers.

6). Concentrate on one part at a time… and ask yourself some tough questions

Take it one challenge at a time rather than focusing on multiple obstacles.

For example, Simon Caulton – STEAMhouse Incubator’s first ever client – has recently launched his company, Ones Trainers. However, along the way, he focused on those small wins – getting the trainers designed, getting them manufactured, raising the money.

If you try and do it all in one stage, then it won’t work.

Ask yourself some tough questions – can I get the product designed? Can I raise the funding? Can I dot he marketing? What have your competitors done that I can improve upon?

Knowing the answers to these questions will help you on your journey to launching a startup.

Help from STEAMhouse Incubator

To become a member of our Incubator, you need a viable business idea. You need to have an appetite for collaboration and a willingness to learn new things.

You’ll get to work with a diverse group of organisations.

Since launching in early 2020, we’ve had a digital marketing agency, an online fashion magazine, a shoe manufacturer, a digital skills educator and many more sign up.

Plus, we’ll be moving to the breath-taking, five-storey STEAMhouse building in early 2022, replete with excellent, state-of-the-art facilities that will provide you with key expertise, collaborative opportunities and much more.


If you would like to learn more about the STEAMhouse Business Incubator or would like to apply for membership, visit the Incubator page.

Click here to learn more about STEAMhouse Business Incubator

Making business innovation accessible and impactful 

One of my favourite books is Ten Types of Innovation by Larry Keeley. In our research, we have found that many businesses think innovation is something only professors can lead. 

However, Larry explains that innovation is the creation of a new, viable offering. It is about identifying problems that matter and systematically creating solutions. 

I think every business in the future needs to be thinking about future customer needs, and can benefit from creating new ideas to solve the problems they face. 

It is key that we make the prospect of developing viable new offerings easier. 

In part, that is about making it more commonplace, accessible and easier to do. It’s about making sure the ecosystem works seamlessly to support that work.

Recognition as a leading innovation institute 

BCU’s mission is to transform lives and we believe innovation has a central role in supporting that. 

As the University for Birmingham, we want to create ways of working that are accessible to all, driving inclusive thinking that encourages us to work collectively to drive change for the better. 

Recently, BCU has received accreditation from The Institute of Innovation and Knowledge Exchange (IKE), becoming the first institution in the Midlands – and only the second in the country – to be awarded such an accolade.

To be accredited, BCU has had to go through a rigorous assessment process. We were assessed on strategy, organisational readiness, core technologies and intellectual property, among other areas. 

I believe BCU’s application stood out as being ambitious, fresh and highly embedded within the SME community. 

They were interested in the ecosystem we have evolved with high levels of stakeholder engagement, as well as the way that we work with our partners, businesses and practitioners.

With our £72 million STEAMhouse innovation centre opening shortly, IKE assessors could see:

Creating an innovation centre 

As a practice-based university, BCU has always supported businesses to grow. 

Feedback has shown, however, that businesses wanted more infrastructure, technical knowhow and support, so that we can go on their journey with them. 

STEAMhouse has been central to creating that infrastructure.  

Through it we have created a space for everyone to experiment, test and develop new knowledge products and services using a STEAM-based approach with a view to establishing a vibrant community of practice. 

This community of learners is under one roof with our startups, micro businesses, SMEs, artists, academics, policy makers and more. 

Combined, it is a powerful force for creating responses to the future challenges, needs and opportunities of our world.    

The IKE accreditation forms a powerful alliance with this infrastructure to help these communities build the knowhow to take those ideas and opportunities back to their respective organisations, in order to implement and scale them.

Building innovative capacity for businesses, students and more 

Our IKE accreditation will afford us the ability to help skill up innovation practitioners to support them in scaling up their ambitions, equipping them with step-by-step guides on where to start, how to support new ideas and implement them. 

Through the process, they will become part of a wider innovation community. 

They will use that insight internally or with our specialist academics to signpost them to the wider ecosystem, should they require alternate support. 

It is our intention to encourage and work with businesses, stakeholders, public and third sector and practitioners to ensure Birmingham and its global partners become a real force for innovation across the UK and beyond.  

In the short term, our focus will be on building up innovative capacity, ensuring more students, more graduates, more SMEs and larger businesses have access to the toolkits which really help seed a shift the culture that is critical to drive innovation. 

We hope that this accredited learning will empower businesses and partners to drive innovation and growth in a practical, inclusive and informative way, making the challenge feel much more accessible. 

I believe that STEAMhouse and our IKE accreditation show that BCU is wholly committed to supporting the region to continue its journey in supporting growth. 

Looking to innovate your business? Look no further than our STEAMhouse facility. Click the button below to discover how our products and services can help you.

Click here to learn more about STEAMhouse

What is the professional mentoring programme?

The Professional Mentoring programme is a university-wide scheme aimed at helping students to develop their employability skills, build confidence and raise aspirations.

The programme provides local businesses with a wonderful opportunity to tap into local talent, build their contacts and meet some of the employees of tomorrow.

You could have the opportunity to provide invaluable support to students and their career decisions.

The ten-week programme involves a minimum of five hours of one-to-one-sessions between mentor and mentee.

Th